Friday, June 21, 2013

Immigrant Joseph J Flory (1682-1741) Part Two

The past few weeks I've been thinking and learning about Martin Luther, and the Protestant Reformation. I want to actually understand and have a feel for what was happening in Europe that led to the emigration of Joseph Flory and his family. I've always been fascinated by history, and combining it with genealogical research really makes it come to life and gives more meaning to it for me.

Who are we? Why are we here? Where did we come from? What is the meaning of life? Always questioning, wanting to understand. Life is one huge puzzle with many pieces that never seem to go together just right.  There are people and organizations that have tried to sell us a finished picture of a puzzle, with beautiful framing. But if you look closely you can see that some of the pieces are missing or have been smeared with filler to hide the holes.

One thing that the vast majority of my ancestors have in common so far, is that they were farmers. I can't find any of them that held a position in politics or government. It's interesting for me to note that in my family, farming seems to be everywhere I look. I don't find them living in cities or the middle of towns. I always find them living in the countryside, several miles from the closest town. In those days even the towns had only a few hundred people living in them.

It's hard today for us to imagine life in earlier centuries. Everything moved at a much slower pace. There were no microwave ovens. There weren't electric stoves. If you wanted even boiling water, it was a process. Most likely you had a wood stove that heated your house, and needed constant supervision and filling to keep it going. You had to make sure you always had firewood and kindling. Everyone in the family had a job to do to keep things going.  There was no modern machinery, and no electronics.

Life was hard and simple. In the 1500s in Europe, 1/4 of all children who were born died before they reached the age of 5. War was rampant. Government and the Church took control over who could own property, over whose births were deemed legitimate, whose marriages were valid, and over whose wills were legal. You were automatically Roman Catholic.

Farmers lived a simple life. All they wanted was land to raise their crops and to raise their families and follow their beliefs in relative peace.

Around 1525 the Anabaptist Movement began in Europe. This is where Mennonites have their roots. Anabaptist means "rebaptizer". They believed in adult baptism rather than infant baptism. To me this seems as much a rebellion against the official Roman Catholic dictates as it was a doctrinal belief.
Menno Simons was an Anabaptist, and the Mennonite faith is named after him.

Menno Simons 1496 - 1561

"Simons was a humble man who lived a hard life. A priest of the Roman Catholic Church, he left by his own choice around 1536, believing he could no longer live with his conscience as a Roman Catholic, He felt that neither the Catholics nor the Reformed Church did much for the inner life of a man, that it was all externalism and hypocrisy. He opposed the fanaticism of his day, and could not understand why Christians persecuted one another. He had many struggles over discipleship and holy living, and truly believed that dedicated Christians would receive persecution from the world. Followers of Menno Simon's teachings came to be called Mennonites, and their work later spread to Russia, the United States and Canada. The Mennonites have always been pacifists, and are earnest, industrious Christians, who have often lived in communal settlements."

In spite of violent rejection by the Church and Government, torture, killings, and many martyrdoms in the 16th century, Anabaptism and the Mennonite faith continued to spread across Europe.

Execution of Mennonites
This engraving depicts the execution of David van der Leyen and Levina Ghyselins, described variously as Dutch Anabaptists or Mennonites, by Catholic authorities in Ghent in 1554. Strangled and burned, van der Leyen was finally dispatched with an iron fork. Bracht’s Martyr’s Mirror is considered by modern Mennonites as second only in importance to the Bible in perpetuating their faith.
http://www.realcourage.org/2010/08/america-and-religious-freedom/f0101/


Part Three will be next.

Thursday, June 6, 2013

Immigrant Joseph J Flory (1682-1741) Part One

For a few months now I've been studying the Flory family and the ancestors of my grandmother on my father's side of our family. I believe history is so very important for us to remember, and we must remember our ancestors who came here. Their religion, beliefs, occupations, and what caused them to leave everything behind and come to a new land thousands of miles from their homeland, all of these things are important for us to understand why we are here.

If we care at all about what is happening in our world today, we must look at the past, and look at everything with a much larger view. History can give us lessons in everything that is happening in our world today. If we ignore history, we cannot look at current events objectively. If we care about our future, we must examine our past.

While by no means an expert on the subject, my goal is to be thorough and accurate, and check and double-check from multiple sources. When I write something here, a lot of reading and cross-checking has been done. That said, I'm human and sometimes make mistakes, and am forever learning.

Joseph J Flory (1682 - 1741) is my 7th great grandfather and sailed here on the ship "Hope" in 1733

Abraham Flory (1735 - 1827) is my 6th great grandfather and son of Joseph J Flory

John Flory (1766 - 1845) is my 5th great grandfather and son of Abraham Flory

John Flory (1794 - 1853) is my 4th great grandfather and son of John Flory

David Flory (1831 - 1908) is my 3rd great grandfather and son of John Flory

Sarah Elizabeth Flory (1856 - 1932) is my 2nd great grandmother and daughter of David Flory

John Franklin Good (1884 - 1978) is my great grandfather and son of Sarah Elizabeth Flory

We'll look at each of these generations, the people and their families in-depth, including where they lived, what was happening in their lives, what they did, how they lived, and relive a story that spans more than 300 years.

The current genealogical research of Joseph J Flory points to him coming from a family of german-speaking Swiss Mennonites. Joseph and his family most likely originated from the Canton of Solothurn, Switzerland. The reason for him coming to America was mainly because of his beliefs and religious persecution. Because that goes to the very core of who he was, and how he lived, and how it follows the family in generations to come, you cannot learn about this family without learning about the Mennonites.

The roots of the Mennonite faith all started with the Protestant Reformation, which began in 1517 when Martin Luther published The Ninety-Five Theses.

The precursors to the Reformation were John Wycliffe ,1330-1384, who "attacked what he saw as corruptions within the church, including the sale of indulgences, pilgrimages, the excessive veneration of saints, and the low moral and intellectual standards of ordained priests" and John Huss (1369–1415) who was a Bohemian priest, excommunicated in 1410, and burned at the stake for heresy in 1415.
http://www.theopedia.com/Protestant_Reformation

The Reformation began as an attempt to reform the Roman Catholic Church, by priests who opposed what they perceived as false doctrines and ecclesiastic malpractice—especially the teaching and the sale of indulgences or the abuses thereof, and simony, the selling and buying of clerical offices—that the reformers saw as evidence of the systemic corruption of the Church's Roman hierarchy, which included the Pope. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Protestant_Reformation

As soon as the coin in the coffer rings,
The soul from purgatory springs.
--John Tetzel, Dominican indulgence vendor

Giovanni Paolo Panini - Interior of St. Peter's, Rome
Leo X, the pope in 1517, needed funds to complete the building of St. Peter's Basilica in Rome. Leo entered into an arrangement that essentially sold indulgence franchises that allowed the franchisee to retain about half the funds raised by selling indulgences in return for sending to Rome the other half for Leo's construction project. To encourage indulgence sales, Albert of Brandenburg, one winner of the privilege of selling indulgences, advertised that his indulgences (issued by the pope) came with a complete remission of sins, allowing escape from all of the pains of purgatory. Moreover, Albert claimed, purchasers of indulgences could use them to free a loved one already dead from the pains of purgatory that he or she might presently be experiencing. The going rate for an indulgence depended on one's station, and ranged from 25 gold florins for Kings and queens and archbishops down to three florins for merchants and just one quarter florin for the poorest of believers. Questions and Answers Concerning Indulgences.



Wednesday, May 29, 2013

8 Generation Snapshot



John Franklin Good
1884-1978
great-grandfather
 History is fascinating, and family ties make it even more so.
(note - I may have made a mistake with the portrait I had thought was of Joseph J Flory, and so removed it until I know for sure. Ancestry.com user uploaded content is not always accurate, which I'm finding out. Apparently that portrait was of Richard Kirwan, not Joseph Flory, after I did a Google duplicate Image search, while thinking about early Mennonites and reading about the typical long beards. Lesson learned.)
Joseph J Flory was born in  Freinschein, Palatinate, Germany in 1682. He was a member of the Mennonite faith, and his family had undergone persecution for many years.

"A letter written (about 1726) by Peter Roth in Germany to his brother Johannes Roth in Pennsylvania says that they are heavily burdened. They are required to pay a militia tax, palace tax, building tax and a monthly tax. Also that there is an order by the civil authorities to sequester the property of all Mennonites for their earnest money. In 1725, a Mennonite family, named Landes, purchased a property near a Palatine village but it was nullified by the electoral regime after Catholics in the region objected. Afterwards, any member of the Catholic, Lutheran or Reformed churches could legally demand that Mennonites return their land purchases. This denial of a normal right (to purchase property) once again sent a shock of dismay through the community."  Read more here about Mennonite persecution and immigration to America

William Penn had traveled to the Palatine after hearing of the religious persecution there, and befriended the Mennonites. With his land in Pennsylvania, he was then able to offer them and others a place to build a community where people of all religions would live in peace. The Mennonites came to the new world to seek relief of heavy taxation and religious restrictions. Also important was the chance for them to buy land with their rights of ownership protected.

Joseph J.Flory and his wife, Mary left Duluth on the Rhine in Germany (Palatinate), and sailed on the ship Hope, from Rotterdam.  They arrived at the port of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania where he and his sons, Joseph (19), Hanliey (17), and Johannes (John) (15) took the oath of allegiance August 28 1733.  Other children accompanying them on their voyage were Maria (21), Katherina (born on the ship) and Jacob.  Joseph was 51 when he sailed to America and settled in Rapho Twp., Lancaster County, PA.

"He built his dugout against a hillside like so many other settlers, near a supply of spring water. Wolves at night time, attracted by the smell of humans, scratched dirt down the chimney. It was necessary then to throw blazing bits of wood up the chimney to frighten them away."
More about Joseph J Flory

Joseph and Mary had one more child after arriving in the New World. Abraham Flory (6th great-grandfather) was born in 1735 and was the first Flory in our family to be born on these shores.
 Genesis 12:2  And I will make of thee a great nation, and I will bless thee, and make thy name great; and thou shalt be a blessing:  

Almost 200 years later, on December 25, 1909, John Franklin Good, 4th great-grandson of Joseph J. Flory, married Lena Evora James at the United Brethren Mennonite Church in Woodland, Michigan.

50 years later, they celebrated their Golden Wedding Anniversary in 1959


For a complete list of the ancestors of John Franklin Good, see the previous post. I hope to cover much more in the future. This is just a brief introduction to the Mennonite ties in our family.

Ancestor list of John Franklin Good

Ancestors of:
John Franklin Good

1st Generation

1.
John Franklin Good was born on Jul. 9, 1884 in Barry, Michigan, United States and died on Jan. 3, 1978 in Lansing, Clinton, Michigan, USA.
Other events in the life of John Franklin Good
Burial
Woodland, Barry County, Michigan, USA


Father:
2.
Isaac M. Good was born in Apr. 1851 in Pennsylvania, USA and died on Dec. 18, 1918 in Woodland, Barry, Michigan, USA.


Mother:
3.
Sarah Elizabeth Good [Flory] was born on Sep. 28, 1856 in Montgomery County, Ohio, USA and died on Jan. 13, 1932 in Nashville, Barry, Michigan, USA.



2nd Generation (Parents)

2.
Isaac M. Good was born in Apr. 1851 in Pennsylvania, USA and died on Dec. 18, 1918 in Woodland, Barry, Michigan, USA. He married Sarah Elizabeth Good [Flory].
Other events in the life of Isaac M. Good
Burial
Woodland, Barry County, Michigan, USA


Father:
4.
Isaac M. Good was born on Aug. 16, 1805 in Lancaster, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, United States and died on Oct. 25, 1875 in West Earl Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.


Mother:
5.
Mary Good [Musselman] was born on Sep. 21, 1812 in Warwick, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, United States and died on Sep. 14, 1883 in West Earl, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, United States.


3.
Sarah Elizabeth Good [Flory] was born on Sep. 28, 1856 in Montgomery County, Ohio, USA and died on Jan. 13, 1932 in Nashville, Barry, Michigan, USA.
Other events in the life of Sarah Elizabeth Good [Flory]
Burial
Woodland, Barry County, Michigan, USA


Father:
6.
David Flory was born on Nov. 9, 1831 in Virginia, United States and died on Feb. 11, 1908 in Nashville, Barry, Michigan, United States.


Mother:
7.
Mary Catherine Flory [Miller] was born on Sep. 4, 1836 in Rockingham, Virginia, United States and died on Jan. 13, 1916 in Woodland, Barry, Michigan, United States.



3rd Generation (Grandparents)

4.
Isaac M. Good was born on Aug. 16, 1805 in Lancaster, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, United States and died on Oct. 25, 1875 in West Earl Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. He married Mary Good [Musselman] in Pennsylvania, United States.
Other events in the life of Isaac M. Good
Burial
Bareville, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, USA


Father:
8.
Michael Good was born on Jul. 15, 1769 in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, United States and died on Feb. 11, 1843 in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, United States.


Mother:
9.
Elizabeth Good [Hunsberger] was born in 1776 and died on Oct. 17, 1856 in West Earl, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, United States.


5.
Mary Good [Musselman] was born on Sep. 21, 1812 in Warwick, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, United States and died on Sep. 14, 1883 in West Earl, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, United States.



Father:
10.
Peter Musselman was born on Nov. 18, 1789 in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania and died in 1828 in Warwick Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.


Mother:
11.
Anna Musselman [Oberholtzer] was born on Jul. 24, 1788 in Warwick Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania and died About 1835 in Warwick Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.


6.
David Flory was born on Nov. 9, 1831 in Virginia, United States and died on Feb. 11, 1908 in Nashville, Barry, Michigan, United States. He married Mary Catherine Flory [Miller] in 1853.
Other events in the life of David Flory
Burial
Woodland, Barry County, Michigan, USA


Father:
12.
John Flory was born on Oct. 27, 1794 in Pleasant Valley, Rockingham, Virginia, USA and died on Oct. 10, 1853 in Virginia, USA.


Mother:
13.
Elizabeth Flory [Whitmore] was born About 1798 in of, Rockingham, Virginia, USA and died on Oct. 12, 1865 in Franklin, Virginia, USA.


7.
Mary Catherine Flory [Miller] was born on Sep. 4, 1836 in Rockingham, Virginia, United States and died on Jan. 13, 1916 in Woodland, Barry, Michigan, United States.
Other events in the life of Mary Catherine Flory [Miller]
Burial
Woodland, Barry County, Michigan, USA


Father:
14.
Isaac Miller was born in 1823 in Rockingham, Virginia, United States and died on Jan. 25, 1895 in Barry, Barry, Michigan, United States.


Mother:
15.
Sallie Miller [Myers] was born in Greenmount, Rockingham, Virginia, United States and died in 1876.



4th Generation (Great-grandparents)

8.
Michael Good was born on Jul. 15, 1769 in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, United States and died on Feb. 11, 1843 in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, United States. He married Elizabeth Good [Hunsberger].



Father:
16.
Henry Good was born in 1738 in Earl, Berks, Pennsylvania, United States and died on Jan. 26, 1792 in Earl, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, United States.


Mother:
17.
Barbara Good [Meyer] was born on May 1, 1739 and died in 1790 in Earl, Berks, Pennsylvania, United States.


9.
Elizabeth Good [Hunsberger] was born in 1776 and died on Oct. 17, 1856 in West Earl, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, United States.


10.
Peter Musselman was born on Nov. 18, 1789 in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania and died in 1828 in Warwick Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. He married Anna Musselman [Oberholtzer] in 1807.


11.
Anna Musselman [Oberholtzer] was born on Jul. 24, 1788 in Warwick Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania and died About 1835 in Warwick Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.


12.
John Flory was born on Oct. 27, 1794 in Pleasant Valley, Rockingham, Virginia, USA and died on Oct. 10, 1853 in Virginia, USA. He married Elizabeth Flory [Whitmore] About 1820 in Rockingham, Virginia, USA.



Father:
18.
John Flory was born on Aug. 8, 1766 in Antrim Twnshp Wash, Franklin, Pennsylvania, United States and died on Feb. 20, 1845 in Pleasant Valley, Rockingham, Virginia USA.


Mother:
19.
Catherine Flory [Garber] was born on Mar. 15, 1771 in Beaver Dam, Frederick, Maryland, United States and died on Sep. 18, 1835 in Pleasant Valley, Rockingham, Virginia, United States.


13.
Elizabeth Flory [Whitmore] was born About 1798 in of, Rockingham, Virginia, USA and died on Oct. 12, 1865 in Franklin, Virginia, USA.


14.
Isaac Miller was born in 1823 in Rockingham, Virginia, United States and died on Jan. 25, 1895 in Barry, Barry, Michigan, United States. He married 1st Sallie Miller [Myers].



Father:
20.
Daniel Miller was born on Jan. 16, 1784 in Shenandoah, Virginia, United States and died in 1847 in Linville Creek, Rockingham, Virginia, United States.


Mother:
21.
Anna Miller [Hoover] was born on Jun. 17, 1785 in Timberville, Rockingham, Virginia, United States and died on Feb. 27, 1860 in Rockingham, Virginia, United States.


15.
Sallie Miller [Myers] was born in Greenmount, Rockingham, Virginia, United States and died in 1876.



5th Generation (Great(2)-grandparents)

16.
Henry Good was born in 1738 in Earl, Berks, Pennsylvania, United States and died on Jan. 26, 1792 in Earl, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, United States. He married Barbara Good [Meyer] in 1766 in Earl, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, United States.



Father:
22.
Jacob Gut was born in 1710 and died on Jan. 23, 1748.


Mother:
23.
widow Gut [Zug].


17.
Barbara Good [Meyer] was born on May 1, 1739 and died in 1790 in Earl, Berks, Pennsylvania, United States.


18.
John Flory was born on Aug. 8, 1766 in Antrim Twnshp Wash, Franklin, Pennsylvania, United States and died on Feb. 20, 1845 in Pleasant Valley, Rockingham, Virginia USA. He married Catherine Flory [Garber] on Apr. 26, 1790 in Flat Rock, Shenandoah, Virginia USA.
Other events in the life of John Flory
Burial
Pleasant Valley (Rockingham County), Rockingham County, Virginia, USA


Father:
24.
Abraham Flory was born in 1735 in PA and died in 1827 in Madison Township, Montgomery County, Ohio.


Mother:
25.
Anna Catherina Flory [Blocher] was born in 1739.


19.
Catherine Flory [Garber] was born on Mar. 15, 1771 in Beaver Dam, Frederick, Maryland, United States and died on Sep. 18, 1835 in Pleasant Valley, Rockingham, Virginia, United States.




Other events in the life of Catherine Flory [Garber]
Burial
Pleasant Valley (Rockingham County), Rockingham County, Virginia, USA


Father:
26.
Johannes H (John) Garber was born in 1717 in Ge and died in 1787.


Mother:
27.
Barbara Garber [Miller] was born in 1733 in PA and died in 1808.


20.
Daniel Miller was born on Jan. 16, 1784 in Shenandoah, Virginia, United States and died in 1847 in Linville Creek, Rockingham, Virginia, United States. He married Anna Miller [Hoover].


21.
Anna Miller [Hoover] was born on Jun. 17, 1785 in Timberville, Rockingham, Virginia, United States and died on Feb. 27, 1860 in Rockingham, Virginia, United States.



6th Generation (Great(3)-grandparents)

22.
Jacob Gut was born in 1710 and died on Jan. 23, 1748. He married widow Gut [Zug].



Father:
28.
Hans Gut was born in 1682 and died in 1747.


23.
widow Gut [Zug].


24.
Abraham Flory was born in 1735 in PA and died in 1827 in Madison Township, Montgomery County, Ohio. He married Anna Catherina Flory [Blocher] in 1759.



Father:
29.
Joseph Flory was born in 1682 and died in Oct. 1741 in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, USA.


Mother:
30.
Anna Maria (Mary) Flory [Bugh].


25.
Anna Catherina Flory [Blocher] was born in 1739.


26.
Johannes H (John) Garber was born in 1717 in Ge and died in 1787. He married Barbara Garber [Miller] in 1752 in PA.
Other events in the life of Johannes H (John) Garber
Arrival
1736
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Burial
Forestville, Shenandoah County, Virginia, USA

27.
Barbara Garber [Miller] was born in 1733 in PA and died in 1808.
Other events in the life of Barbara Garber [Miller]
Burial
Forestville, Shenandoah County, Virginia, USA


7th Generation (Great(4)-grandparents)

28.
Hans Gut was born in 1682 and died in 1747.



Father:
31.
Jakob Gut Good was born in 1657 in Steinsfurt, Rhein-Neckar-Kreis, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany and died in 1730 in Conestoga, Chester, Pennsylvania, United States.


Mother:
32.
Maria Gut Good [Meyer] was born in 1660 in Germany and died in 1686 in Michelsfeld, Germany.


29.
Joseph Flory was born in 1682 and died in Oct. 1741 in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, USA. He married Anna Maria (Mary) Flory [Bugh].
Other events in the life of Joseph Flory
Arrival
1733
arrived from Germany on "The Hope" (ship)

30.
Anna Maria (Mary) Flory [Bugh].



8th Generation (Great(5)-grandparents)

31.
Jakob Gut Good was born in 1657 in Steinsfurt, Rhein-Neckar-Kreis, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany and died in 1730 in Conestoga, Chester, Pennsylvania, United States. He married Maria Gut Good [Meyer] on Feb. 18, 1679 in Sinsheim, Rhein-Neckar-Kreis, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany.
Other events in the life of Jakob Gut Good
Arrival
Between 1618 and 1718
Pennsylvania


Father:
33.
Peter Gut was born in 1635 and died in 1671.


Mother:
34.
Barbara Gut [Graber] was born in 1634 in Palatinate and died in 1668.


32.
Maria Gut Good [Meyer] was born in 1660 in Germany and died in 1686 in Michelsfeld, Germany.



9th Generation (Great(6)-grandparents)

33.
Peter Gut was born in 1635 and died in 1671. He married Barbara Gut [Graber].


34.
Barbara Gut [Graber] was born in 1634 in Palatinate and died in 1668.